Monthly Archives

October 2017

Case Study Shows chameleon™ Platform Saves 15%!

By | Case Studies | No Comments

The Results Are In

A new case study has been posted online concerning the energy consumption of a quick service hamburger chain and methods used to decrease their consumption. Restaurants consume two times more energy per square foot than any other building. With the food service industry only growing, now at 620,807 restaurants in the U.S, we can expect the energy consumption to grow along with it.

A franchisee was seeking an enterprise-wide energy management, equipment diagnostics, and food safety platform all in one. Three different locations, located in varying geographical areas, were tested over a 6 week period. The chameleon™ platform consisted of lighting, refrigeration HVAC and food safety equipment.

While the system proved to be successful at reducing energy consumption, it also provided some auxiliary benefits to the client. ‘We often see a shift in staff behavior” says Small Box Energy Director of Deployment, Jim Parker. The shift in staff behavior leads to decreases in energy consumption when it comes to adjusting the A/C down and leaving walk-in doors propped open. These types of behaviors happen a lot less when restrictions are put in place for HVAC, and when alarms are sent when doors are propped open for extended periods of time. This is how our system provides visibility to every owner and operator. You become more aware of the things happening with your critical systems and staff while you are away. When you have the data to back it up, you can manage all of your locations more efficiently. This is why our platform is not just an energy-saving platform but a critical systems platform. Food loss and early equipment diagnostics came into play in this particular study. The franchisee saw as much as 15% monthly savings on energy consumption alone in just one of the locations.

Check out the full case study and more HERE.

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Convenience Stores Step Up Tech Game

By | c-stores, IoT | No Comments

The Age of Convenience

There is one thing I consistently find so interesting, the one thing almost every single person has on them at all times….their phone a $800 (sometimes more now) dollar piece of our lives. Which, by the way, is not just a phone anymore but a smart device that can make calls, surf the web, be your personal assistant, translate a foreign language for you, and the apps….there are multiple apps for anything you can think of. This is a device of convenience…we don’t even have to leave our house or pick up the phone to get any kind of food delivered to our house. In this age of convenience, where anything and everything is right at your fingertips retailers have since been capitalizing on that and now come the convenience stores.

Convenience Store News conducted a study focusing on technology and how it plays a role in convenience stores. They discovered that over 50% of those who participated in the study plan to add new equipment and replace old technology this year. The change is thought to be attributed to the realization that technology can bring together and help grow other aspects of a convenience store owners business. Much like a building automation systems already do for retail and restaurant locations. With the trend of food service growing in convenience stores now the food safety aspect will come into play as well.

Another notable finding from the study was the increase in new products being introduced to the customer via social media, 46 percent to be exact. The companies already using social media have their own mobile app and are using it to keep their customer base educated and engaged. According to Statista, 81% of Americans have a social media profile, over 1.96 billion people are on social media worldwide and that number is expected to grow to 2.5 billion in 2018. With that eye-popping number, it’s a given that social media marketing is a must.

Casey’s General Stores’ mobile app just surpassed 1 million downloads since it launched in January 2016. The app offers the essentials: hours of operation, location but with some awesome feathers like ordering pizza and made-to-order sub sandwiches. The success of this app just reinforces the findings from Convenience Store News, technology integration is essential for your business to thrive in this technology-driven world. It’s not just about having an app or system that integrates with your store, but an app that is useful to your customers, a system that is useful to you….an app that keeps your customers opening it daily and a system that keeps showing its worth to you and your staff daily.

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Safe Quality Food (SQF) Changes in Store for 2018

By | Food Safety, Restaurant Tips, Uncategorized | No Comments

Changes Are A Comin'

Food safety magazine reported that 2018 will be the year of food safety advances. The food safety system certification 22000 will go to version 4.1 and the third party, safe quality food (SQF) will advance to edition 8.0. The 8th edition will go into effect January 2, 2018, what that means is that all recertifications and unannounced recertification audits will use the edition 8 code as a guideline. There have been many changes but we will go through the major changes to the code and list out appropriate modules here. The modules and new codes can be found at www.sqfi.com under document downloads.

  • The “levels” of the code have been replaced with Food Safety Fundamentals, Food Safety Code, and Quality code.
    • Food Safety Fundamentals, which was formerly level 1 in SQF edition 7, is the entry-level food safety code for small or developing food and pet food manufacturers. HACCP reporting is not required at this level and the applicable modules are 7,11,12 and 13.
  • Food Safety Code, which was formerly level 2 in SQF edition 7, is applicable to primary production, manufacturing, storage and distribution, manufacturers of packaging materials and retail. Primary production is held to food safety codes 1,3,5,6 and modules 5,6,7,7h, and 8. Manufacturing is held to food safety codes 4,7-22,25, 31-34 and modules 3,4,9,10,11. Storage and distribution are held to food safety code 26 and module 12. Manufacturers of packaging materials are held to food safety code 27 and module 13. Lastly, retail is held to food safety code 24 and module 15 which is a new module in edition 8.
  • The Quality Code, which was formerly level 3 in SQF edition 7, is applicable to system elements to specify quality. Can be conducted with or without the food safety audit and the results will not affect the score of the food safety audit. This is not available for food retail.

There are also some new additions to edition 8 that edition 7 did not have before. There is an SQF food safety code for manufacturing, one for storage distribution, and one each for packaging and primary agriculture which there was not before. There is also a new food safety code for retail locations. Some notable changes were made to SQF 8.0 regarding food packaging lines and food labeling, quality code, food sector changes and implementation of a communications program by senior management.

This new code will be more stringent on those who will have to abide but was much needed since the Food Safety MOdernization Act (FSMA) that was signed into law in 2011 by President Obama and the most recently used code, SQF 7.0, which was published in 2012.

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